Camera Trap Sightings From Namibia!
Camera Trap Sightings From Namibia!

Camera Trap Sightings From Namibia!

Namibia Wildlife Sanctuary

Namibia Wildlife Sanctuary

14 - 84 Nights from $1,369.00

Experience hands-on volunteering in Africa in the heart of the beautiful Namibian wilderness!

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David's Journey as a Return Volunteer in Africa and Sri Lanka!

David's Journey as a Return Volunteer in Africa and Sri Lanka!

Return volunteer David Pratt has joined the Kariega 'Big 5' Conservation Project in Africa and The Great Elephant Project in Sri Lanka and has shared his amazing experiences. From memorable wildlife encounters to valuable tips for future volunteers, find out more about his journey in today's blog.

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My Namibian Experience As A Mature Volunteer

My Namibian Experience As A Mature Volunteer

Barbara recently joined the Namibia Wildlife Sanctuary as a mature volunteer. Read today's blog to find out what she got up to during her time on the project including the highlights of her experience, up-close interactions with wildlife, and top tips for future volunteers.

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Two Rewilded Cheetahs, Two Years On - A Remarkable Rewilding Story

Two Rewilded Cheetahs, Two Years On - A Remarkable Rewilding Story

Join us on a remarkable rewilding journey as we revisit the inspiring story of Kumbe and Jabari, two cheetah brothers born in captivity who found their way back to the wild in Zimbabwe. Two years later, we delve into their Phase 3 of release with updates from The Rhino & Elephant Conservation Project.

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Posted by Michael Starbuck on 23rd Jan 2017 2 mins

Anyone who has been in the vicinity of wild animals before will know that more often than not, they can be very difficult to spot at times so a helping hand is often welcomed! It is in these situations where camera traps can come in very handy! A camera trap is a small camera, often contained within a protective box, which is placed in a location in which animals are often known to frequent.

Setting a camera trap

They are used as a non-invasive way of monitoring animal behaviour and movements, and one of our projects that makes a lot of use of these clever devices is the Namibia Wildlife Sanctuary. The staff at the sanctuary then uses the results from the camera traps to educate local people about the animal behaviour and how to avoid conflict with the wildlife.

Community work in Namibia

As the project is now spread across the sanctuary itself and three research sites, the cameras provide an invaluable insight into animal behaviour in this huge land mass, and we have some amazing snaps that they have gathered to share with you all!

Namibia Cheetah

First up we have this rather eerie image of 4 cheetahs gathering round for a drink at the Kanaan research site.

 

Namibia Elephants

Next we have an image of these gentle giants at the Mangetti research site!

 

Namibian Wild Dog

Found on the same research site as the elephants above, this African Wild Dog evidently fancied a nighttime stroll!

 

Namibia Leopard

In one of the most spectacular camera trap shots we have seen, here you can see a leopard walking calmly alongside an antelope. Leopards will only take down prey when they are hungry, so the fact that this particular big cat had already had a good meal meant that this lucky antelope had nothing to worry about!

Namibia Volunteers

Every now and again the cameras capture some 2 legged animals as well as the more regular 4 legged variety...

If you would like to be part of the team that helps to gather incredible images like these, then why not consider a volunteering trip to the Namibia Wildlife Sanctuary whilst you can still take advantage of the 20% off discount we are offering until the end of the month!

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