Volunteer With Sharks

Sharks are renowned for being the feared apex predators of the ocean, and thanks to films such as Jaws, Deep Blue Sea, along with various publications choosing to run with this theme, sharks have even become hated by some humans.

However, what some people don’t know is that sharks actually kill only around 12 humans a year, and this often happens by accident. Sharks don’t like the taste of humans, but often mistake those in canoes or small boats for seals on the ocean surface. Otherwise, sharks have been known to investigate a splashing human when they are curious or confused, which can lead to accidental attacks.

What’s more, sharks have much more to fear from humans than we do from them. Sharks are hunted and killed for their meat, internal organs and fins. For every human killed by a shark, around 8.5 million sharks are slaughtered in the same time span. This is why volunteering with sharks is essential for their survival.

Our various shark volunteer programs offer you the chance to witness these majestic fish in the flesh, whilst aiding their conservation. Whether it be cage diving with Great Whites in South Africa to collect data on shark populations, or swimming with whale sharks in the Maldives to identify individuals, there are a lot of different ways you can become a shark conservation volunteer with The Great Projects. All you have to do is select which shark volunteer project you most want to visit. So, what are you waiting for? Secure your place to volunteer with sharks today!

Sharks At A Glance

ENDANGERED STATUS
Vulnerable/Endangered
NUMBER REMAINING IN THE WILD
Varies Across Species - Around 3,500 Great Whites Remain
ENDEMIC REGION
Oceans All Around The World

How Endangered Are Sharks

It is estimated that there are over 400 species of shark that reside in the world’s oceans, but there are a select few of those which are a cause for concern in the world of conservation.

In the last census taken in 2010, it was estimated that there were just 3,500 Great White Sharks remaining. Despite reports of an increase in numbers, an accurate population count is extremely difficult to calculate. They are listed as vulnerable by WWF.

One of the most elusive shark species, the whale shark, is listed as endangered by WWF. Populations of this fish are unknown, but all sharks are facing huge threats from humans and action must be taken.

Threats Sharks Are Facing

You will not be surprised to hear that the biggest threat to the shark population is humans, and some of the issues they are facing are:

  • Finning – this barbaric process involves catching the shark, removing its fin (while the shark is still alive) before throwing it back into the sea. The shark will most likely suffer agonising pain before it eventually dies.
  • Hunting – sharks are hunted for their organs, fins and meat, which is used for soup, medicine, leather and some lubricants.
  • Bycatch – sharks are often killed when they are caught up in the nets of commercial fishing operations which is referred to as bycatch as they are not the intended target of the nets.
Fast Facts
  • Sharks kill 12 people per year, while it is estimated that 11,417 sharks are slaughtered by humans per hour.
  • A very big debate for shark experts is whether or not they sleep. The answer is that they do, but not in the same ways as humans. Some believe that sharks need to keep swimming at all times in order to breathe, and so they must not sleep at all. However, some sharks drift between periods of alert wakefulness and rest that is similar to sleep – but it is said they never shut their eyes!
  • Bamboo sharks are commonly known as carpet sharks. This is because they spend their days gliding along the ocean floor. 

Projects Do More

Shark Articles

Is Discovery Channel's 'Shark Week' Doing More Harm Than Good?

Is the Discovery Channel's annual 'Shark Week' encouraging the fear of sharks rather than raising awareness of shark conservation needs? Check out the three documentaries recommended in this blog that will change your perception on sharks and show you the real plight these animals are facing.


Shark Awareness Day 2018 - An Animal To Be Revered, Not Feared

The 14th of July marks Shark Awareness Day - read on to discover why this incredible yet misunderstood animal is so vital to our world, and see how you can make a difference to its protection. From volunteering to education, tourism to recycling, we can all work to save one of the most famously maligned creatures on earth.


Help Keep Our Oceans Clean This Mother Ocean Day!

Happy Mother Ocean Day! This awareness day is a time to reflect on the beauty and wonder of our 5 oceans. With the ocean covering two-thirds of our planet, we should appreciate just how essential the ocean is to life as we know it. Today, it's important to look at how we treat the sea and how we can protect the many creatures that call it home! 


How The Perhentian Islands Marine Project Keeps Their Coasts Clear

How The Perhentian Islands Marine Project Keeps Their Coasts Clear

Check out all the hard work of those at the Perhentian...

Katie's Review Of The Maldives Whale Shark Research Project- Saving Turtles, Swimming With Whale Sharks, And Meeting New Friends!

Katie's Review Of The Maldives Whale Shark Research Project- Saving Turtles, Swimming With Whale Sharks, And Meeting New Friends!

Back in 2017, Katie volunteered on the Maldives Whale Shark...

World Whale Shark Day 2017! Wild Population Numbers Of This Elusive Species Are Unknown!

World Whale Shark Day 2017! Wild Population Numbers Of This Elusive Species Are Unknown!

August 30th plays host to World Whale Shark Day 2017! The...

Visit The Mafia Island Whale Shark Conservation Project And Get A Whopping 33% Discount!

Visit The Mafia Island Whale Shark Conservation Project And Get A Whopping 33% Discount!

If you book to volunteer with whale sharks on the Mafia...

Where you can go
Contact Info
UK Office
The Great Traveller Ltd,
3 Dairy Yard
Star Street
Ware, Hertfordshire
SG12 7DX
United Kingdom

Opening hours:
   Mon-Fri 8:30am–5:30pm
   Sat 10am-4pm

T: +44(0) 208 885 4987

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