Sea Turtle Conservation

Sea turtles are amazing and beautiful creatures, but few people realise just how big they can get. Some of them grow to three metres long and they can weigh as much as 750 kilograms, and many of them have stunningly beautiful shells. However, this is where the problem lies for many species of turtle - they are poached for their shells to the point where they are now close to extinction. This, alongside the damage that is often caused to their natural habitats, is why sea turtle conservation is so important.

We offer three opportunities for you to volunteer on a turtle project to help protect them and conserve their nesting grounds. These projects are located in: Costa Rica, the Perhentian Islands and the Kosgoda region of Sri Lanka. They are all beautiful locations to visit, and you will be able to observe as many as five different species of turtle. Whilst at these projects you will get the chance to take part in a number of conservation activities that includes taking part in a hatchery programme, burying eggs into the sand of the local beaches, and occasionally even heading out on a night patrol to prevent poachers from stealing turtle eggs. If you would like the chance to aid sea turtle conservation efforts then why not become our next volunteer!

Turtles at a Glance

ENDANGERED STATUS
Endangered
NUMBER REMAINING IN THE WILD
Varies dependent on species
ENDEMIC REGION
Oceans all around the world

How endangered are turtles

The numbers of sea turtles found in the wild varies greatly by species. The most endangered species of sea turtle is the Kemp Ridley, as its numbers have suffered a lot since the 1940’s when 42,000 were filmed nesting in one location. Researchers have found it difficult to get an accurate figure for the number of sea turtles that are remaining in the wild due to their elusive nature, and the sheer number of hatchlings who never make it to adulthood.

What we do know though is that all 7 species need concerted conservation efforts if they are to survive.

Threats turtles are facing

Sea turtles are relatively defenceless to human actions, despite what their shell would have you believe. Some of the things most affecting their numbers include:

  • Bycatch – Every year hundreds of thousands of sea turtles are accidentally caught up in fishing nets and they often die in the process.
  • Overharvesting –There is still a huge demand for turtle egg soup and as a result thousands of hatchlings are killed each year to fuel the trade.
  • Climate Change – Sea turtles are very sensitive to even the smallest of changes in water temperature and this has affected the breeding cycle.
Fast Facts
  • Leatherback sea turtles can travel more than 10,000 miles every year!
  • Female turtles lay their eggs at the same beach on which they were born.
  • Green turtles can hold their breath for up to five hours.

Projects Do More

Where you can go
Contact Info
UK Office
The Great Traveller Ltd,
3 Dairy Yard
Star Street
Ware, Hertfordshire
SG12 9BX
United Kingdom
Opening hours: 9am–5pm

T: +44(0) 208 885 4987

Australian Office
The Great Projects,
39 Cairngorm Street,
Carrara, 4211
Australia

T: +61(0) 755020457